Exploring the East of England: beyond the Essex border

I have lived in the East of England all my life, either in Ipswich or in Colchester. And I love it here. 15 minute drive out and you’re in the countryside, 20 minute drive and you’re at the beach, and it’s not too fair from London either! In this blog I am going to tell you about the gems of the East of England, in Suffolk and Norfolk. Lets go beyond the Essex border!

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 The Farm

Suffolk is the neighbouring county to Essex and it has a reputation for being very country. So what is more country than a trip to the farm?  Suffolk was a lot of farms to explore including Easton Farm Park, Jimmy’s farm and Baylham House Rare Breed Farm. Depending on the farm, you might get to feed the animals, hold lambs and see a range of different farm yard animals! Check them out to find out what each farm has to offer and how much entry is! Here’s a picture of me loving life with a sheep last weekend at Easton Farm Park!

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The beach

The best thing about living in the east of England is you’re never too far from the coast! There are so many good beaches to go to in Essex, Suffolk and Norfolk! Felixstowe is my local beach and you can get a train there via Ipswich. It is quite a stoney beach and maybe not as much there as Clacton, but who doesn’t love an ice-cream by the sea?!

Bored of the beaches in Essex? How about Great Yarmouth in Norfolk? Great Yarmouth is basically the childhood holiday of everyone who lives in the East of England! I’d go on holiday to Great Yarmouth and see the whole of my high school while I was there! Great Yarmouth has a pier, arcades, rides, seaside shops, sealife aquarium and of course the beach! You can get there by getting the train from Colchester to Norwich and then Norwich to Great Yarmouth.

Norfolk beaches are also known for being home to seals. You tend to be able to find them at Horsey beach. You can also take a boat trip to go and see them too!

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Flatford Mill

Another gem of Suffolk is Flatford Mill. It is great for a walk or a picnic but the best part about Flatford Mill is that you can higher rowing boats and row down the River Stour. This is one of my favourite things to do in the summer and it is so relaxing! Perfect way to de-stress from the thought of revision!

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Framlingham Castle

 Are you any chance an Ed Sheeran fan? Do you know his song castle on the hill? Well it is about Framlingham castle! This is proper getting into Suffolk countryside. You can walk along the castle grounds and take a picnic! If you love a bit of country side and want to see where Ed Sheeran spent his teenage years tend this is the place to go!

Norwich Shopping

 Because who doesn’t love a bit of retail therapy? Norwich is the place to go if you want a city with a decent shopping centre. It is the best place to go for shopping in the east of England. With plenty of variety of shops and places to eat! There is also a castle and a cathedral  if you want some culture too.

Ipswich Waterfront

 So Ipswich is my hometown. Although it doesn’t have the biggest town of shops it’s still nice if you like to go somewhere different to shop! But the best bit of Ipswich is the waterfront. It is near the university and not a long walk from the train station. It has restaurants, a pub and hotels. If you do go to the Ipswich waterfront I would suggest going for a drink or meal in the pub Isaac’s. My cousin had his wedding their last year and it’s a lovely little pub! It is the beer garden to be when we get that 2 day heatwave!

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So that’s pretty much everywhere I have spent my childhood summed up. The great thing about living in Essex is that you can easily get to places in Suffolk and Essex by trains and bus!

 

Why Essex was my first choice

If you’re familiar to the Harry Potter film series, then I liken finding the right University to finding the right wand for yourself. You may think that you know what you want but ultimately “the wand chooses the wizard”.

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I’ve got to be honest, Essex was not initially my first choice when I was looking at Universities. In fact, it was not even on my radar as somewhere where I wanted to study. It was too close to home and I was dead set on studying Drama somewhere like London, where there are countless theatres and loads of things to do.

However, I went on a day trip with my Sixth Form to the Colchester campus and it was surprisingly good. Me and my mates had a really cool day looking around the place, seeing what University life had to offer.

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So, when it came to organising Open Days, I just put Essex on the to visit list on a whim. It was quite a cool campus and I thought that it would be a decent benchmark to compare other universities to.

It ended up not only setting the benchmark for me but actually setting it so damn high that I couldn’t top it. No matter how hard I tried to find faults in the University….

However, despite my reluctance, my little brother always knew where I should go. He always loves coming to visit me at Uni because he got given a free bag of popcorn from the SU on the open day. I often remind him that it was only for the open day and we don’t get free popcorn all the time at Uni!

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Little by little, as I came for my interview for Essex, my dream of studying in London started to crumble as I fell in love with the idea of campus life at Essex. Suddenly, it’s distance from home and the fact that it was a train ride to London didn’t matter anymore.

Essex had the right course for me, good theatres on its doorstep and an irresistibly good feel to the place. In better words, it felt like somewhere where I could actually imagine spending the next few years of my life.

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While Essex may not be everybody’s first choice, there’s one thing which remains the same: choosing your first-choice University is always a big commitment and a big decision to make. It will most likely take a lot of time, thought and effort. But in the end, the choice will be obvious once you realise that your first choice is somewhere where you will be happy.

That’s when, like the wands, the “University chooses the student”.

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How my life has changed from college to university

I am sure I’m not the only one that is utterly shocked at the speed this academic years has flown by. Despite this being my second year here, it still doesn’t seem that long ago since I was back in college, studying a handful of A-levels and wondering what direction I wanted my life to go in! The step up to uni is one of the biggest transitions we’ve all had to make, and there were a lot of differences to college life that I certainly didn’t expect.

My constant need for extra sleep

During my A-level years, I could get up at 7 am, do a morning paper round, before completing a full 9 am to 3 pm day of classes, and still have the energy to hang out with my friends all evening. Oh, how things have changed! I have now reached a point where one to two hours of lectures leaves me yearning for my bed and a chance to recover. With the regular availability of alcohol combined with the deadlines constantly looming over your head, spending the early hours of your day productively has become more of a pipe dream!

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No matter what A-levels you took, the style of learning and working will feel very different after experiencing those first few lectures or seminars. I realised that much of my subject knowledge was no longer understood in a classroom-style environment, but instead in my hours outside of the lecture theatres. Whether your course is mainly exam-based or filled with regular assignments, your time management and organisational skills will, eventually, reach a whole new level of ‘On Point’, even if that means occasionally working until 3 am bashing out a 2000 word essay the night before it’s due (not that I would know about that….).

Difference in Lifestyle

A big change many of us were probably preparing ourselves for well in advance was living away from home, whether it be on or off campus. I imagine many students, myself included, thought that having 3 well-balanced meals a day would be a simple part of uni life on top of the workload. And yet, I write this while planning my typical dinner of a piece of chicken with some plain rice, so clearly, I was mistaken! Add to this the need to do washing and clean up after yourself, and at times it just seems all too much! But despite it all, living with people that are going through the exact same struggles just makes it that bit more tolerable, and we find a way to survive.

Although this is just scraping the barrel when it comes to the reality of university life, I wouldn’t change a thing about it. Having the opportunity to study something I love and feel the freedom that independence comes with is an experience like no other. Far gone are the monotonous days of college classes, and I’ve never been happier about it! Many of you will agree it is certainly a rollercoaster, but despite the ups and downs, you often feel like you never want it to end.

Accommodation stereotypes: What kind of person lives where!

The Towers

If I could describe our amazing Towers with one word, that would be social. The Towers, either South Towers or North Towers, are the most social type of accommodation at the university and also the most fun one! Having 16 to 13 people per flat, depending on which tower you live in, it is no surprise either.

Imagine having not only your flatmates as instant friends but the whole tower, since people tend to know each other from other flats and socialise a lot. Also, another plus would be the fact that you are bound to live with people from all around the world which means that you could get friends from all around the world, how cool is that?!

The Towers are a place for a good hangout. There is no chance you can feel alone here. There is not one day that is the same when you live here and that is why Towers are so magical.


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The houses

The Houses are housing (get it?) the forever knowledge-hungry students They are located only a few minutes away from the Student Centre and the Library, so you’re only a quick step away from all the computers and materials that are available to us students. The Houses are kind of the opposite of The Towers, but that by no means equals boring! They are centrally located, which means you’re super close to campus and there are 4 to 6 people per flat – perfect for a close-knit group of friends!

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The Quays

The Quays are next to a river and beautiful greenery, but as they’re a bit of a walk away from campus you can expect everyone to be out all the time. You will see the usual sporty people running along the river, playing badminton, enjoying a bike ride, and also just people out and about, sunbathing or just out for a picnic! The Quays are also super close to the train station, so if you fancy an impromptu weekend away or just a day trip, there is a 150% chance that you will find a minimum of 10 people going with you. The Quays are definitely for the curious adventurers who are eager to explore and be out and about!

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South Courts

South Courts, being one of the most high-end type of accommodation we have, will definitely give you what you pay for. En-suite bathrooms in each room and only a three minutes’ walk away from Square 3, you definitely get the bang for your buck. It is an ideal choice for the sports fanatic, since it is located right next to the Sports Centre and Evolve Gym. It is also our largest accommodation area, so if you are thinking of moving to South Courts, be ready to see LOAAAADS of people. Housing 4 to 6 students per flat, and in some up to 12 students, it’s a perfect balance for your academic studies and social life.

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But this is not everything the uni offers in terms of accommodation! Have a look at their website for more info on the others or if simply you want to find out more about the ones I talked about here 🙂

The things I wished I’d know about university before starting: Busting the four big myths about university

If you have a strong, preconceived idea about what life will be like at university then this blog may ruin that. If however, you are happy to have those ideas challenged then continue reading. Essentially this is what I wished I’d known about university all the way back when I was a young and naive fresher.mythbusting-min

Myth: Students drink and party all the time

Truth: I would be lying if I said students didn’t drink, of course they do. As someone who doesn’t drink that often, I was worried that I wouldn’t fit in at university or that people would pressure me to drink. But that didn’t happen, in fact people have been very accepting. There are tons of people who don’t drink and there are tons of people who do, so there will always be people in the same position as you.

While I can’t speak for other universities, at Essex a great deal of effort goes into ensuring that there is a good mix between events that involve drinking and those that don’t. So there should be something for everyone.

Myth: You’ll meet you best friend on the first day

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Truth: Unfortunately there are no guarantees of this. University is a big place with thousands of people, so don’t be surprised if it takes a while to “click” with people. I met someone who I regard as one of my closest friends during the first week of term and the rest of my friendship group evolved over a number of months.

It has certainly been romanticised that you’ll move in or arrive on your first day and meet your new best friend. Having spoken to a number of people this isn’t always the case, but don’t be disheartened as you’ll make friends eventually.

Myth: Everyone will be smarter than me

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Truth: Don’t sell yourself short. Everyone will have come from different backgrounds and will have learnt different things. As an English Literature student I’ve found that the Literature I studied at school is different from the Literature that someone else studied- yet we both have an A-level in Literature.

There will be people who have extensive knowledge in certain areas, but then you might outwit them in another area. Remember one of the points of first year is to get everyone up to the same level of knowledge.

Myth: You have to buy everything before you arrive

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Truth: No! No! No! No! Ok, so you may think that you are a whizz in the kitchen but even Gordon Ramsey doesn’t need six toasters and three kettles!

Firstly, check what the university provides (normally listed on the accommodation pages). Secondly, check if your university allows you to contact your new house/ flat mates- this is something that you can do at Essex and is a great way to make initial introductions and arrange what to bring for communal use. Thirdly, don’t forget that shops exist! So you don’t need to bring a weeks worth of food, a years supply of clothes and all the bedding to last a lifetime. Quite simply you can save space in the car by thinking ahead for the less essential things and buying them at a later date – panic over!

Perry’s Essex Abroad travelling experience

So for the past few months, some could say that I was living the dream. If studying abroad in Brisbane wasn’t enough, a three month University summer break from November to February meant that I could travel across Oceania and Asia.

It was kind of like a mini-gap year experience as I visited 7 countries and spent 79 days on the road.

And if you’re wondering what that would look like, well it looks a little like this…

Now if that was all a bit quick then let me tell you about each stop of my journey…

Sydney

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The first stop on my journey was a hop down the coast to Sydney. Here me and my friends did the obvious tourist attractions, went to Bondi Beach and hung out in cool secret bars.

Fun fact: I have now been to the Sydney Opera House more times than the man who designed it. Jørn Utzon, the designer of the Sydney Opera House, never actually visited the finished building after falling out with the government at the time over escalating costs.

South East Coast Road Trip!

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Instead of flying straight down to Melbourne, we took the long way down taking the time to over 1,000 km in the space of just over a week.

So we hired cars and camped along the way as we saw the Blue Mountains, Wilson’s Prom and The Great Ocean Road. We also conquered (the almost impossible to pronounce) Mount Kosciuszko, the tallest mountain in Australia.

Fun Fact: Wilson’s Prom, a beautiful national park on a peninsula is the southernmost point of mainland Australia. It was here where we bumped into a womenswear photo shoot on a deserted beach and unintentionally got used for a few practice shots!

Melbourne

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Melbourne is probably one of my favourite cities in Australia. Although this time around we were only there for a few days, its street art and alleyways were enchanting!

Here we stayed in an apartment in the city centre for a few days which was perfect! One day we even had a mini Christmas day where we cooked a roast dinner, played games and watched movies. It may have been 6th December but we had to make use of having a place to ourselves in the festive period!

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Fun Fact: We were lucky enough to have our apartment overlooking one of the city’s biggest tourist attractions, Hosier Lane. Whilst we were there, we saw a new piece of art being created in the pouring rain. This may be Banksy or some other big name street artist but we’ll never know!

Tasmania

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I wasn’t really sure what to expect from Tasmania before I went. I wasn’t that fussed about going but my friends dragged me along and I was so glad that I went!

This Australian state isn’t massive compared to its mainland counterparts but what it lacks in size, it more than makes up in terms of beauty!

We took a week to explore this marvellous landscape in two groovy camper vans…

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Fun Fact: Whilst in Tasmania, we spent the day scaling Cradle Mountain, ranked as one of Australia’s most beautiful places by Lonely Planet.

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This was an exciting stop on our trip as it was the first time that we had left Australia!

Here we spent 3 weeks exploring the whole country on the Kiwi experience tour bus, spending a day or two in each town along the way.

It was a jam packed few weeks full of bungee jumping, street luging, lakes, mountains, Lord of the Rings, Maori Culture, hiking… I could go on!

This was also our destination for the festive season including Christmas Day and New Years which was exciting and very different to back home! I don’t think Christmas day barbecues on the beach will be much of a feature in many more Christmases to come!

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Fun Fact: One of the last attractions that we visited in New Zealand was the Hobbiton movie sets which were used in the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit movies. There are 44 hobbit holes dug into the side of the hill and you walk exactly the same steps that the characters made in the film. Even though I have yet to see any of the films it was used for (pathetic really I know), it’s amazing to see the lengths movies go to to create their sets.

Fiji

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Fiji was a welcome rest from the exhausting action packed New Zealand. Days generally consisted of exploring tiny little islands, laying in a hammock, going snorkelling in the reef and playing Beach Volleyball.

It was a struggle, it really was.

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Fun fact: The above picture was taken on the island where the Tom Hanks film Castaway was filmed. Despite it being another film which I have not yet seen (I should really watch some more films…), the ocean views more than made up for it!

Australian Open (Melbourne)

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With a few days before the Asia leg of my trip, I couldn’t resist going to back to Melbourne for a few days for the Australian Open whilst the others recuperated back in Brisbane!

If you haven’t heard of it, the Australian Open is one of the biggest and most important Tennis tournaments in the world! It’s basically Australia’s version of Wimbledon!

I had a ground pass for the first three days of the tournament, which allowed me to see players like Kei Nishikori, Gael Monflis and Alexander Zverv amongst others.

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Fun fact: The last match I saw, I had front row seats for the Brit Dan Evans and his win against world no.7 Marin Cilic. The win which was very unexpected for Evans and played a massive part in the player’s best ever run in a Grand Slam.

Vietnam

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Vietnam was definitely something else! It was my first time in Asia and it was probably unlike anywhere where I had been before with crazy moped drivers and a unrecognisable language to deal with!

We only had 10 days in the country, so we didn’t have much time to waste! We visited the two main cities; Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City and visited congested alleyways, beautiful bays, peaceful villages and some really interesting war museums!

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Fun fact: We were lucky enough for our visit to the country  to coincide with the Lunar New Year celebrations. When we explored Hanoi in particular, we witnessed a lot of traditions which take place at this time of year. One of which is burning fake money for good luck. Unfortunately some of these notes don’t get burnt and get taken by the wind, leaving them on the pavement somewhere! The amount of times I thought that I had found some money on the floor only for it to be fake was heartbreaking!

Cambodia

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If you thought that we rushing through Vietnam in 10 days was bad enough then we (somehow) managed to squeeze Cambodia into 4! It took a lot of precision and planning to get it right but we did it with time to spare!

We spent one day in the capital Phonm Penh learning about the country’s devastating recent history and the rest of the time at Siem Reap where the famous Angkor Wat Temple complex is located.

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(Not so) fun fact: During the genocides in the country throughout the 1970’s, it is estimated that around 2 million people died. That’s around a quarter of the country’s population. Seeing the prisons and the fields in Phonm Penh where these people were killed was incredibly powerful and touching.

Malaysia

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Malaysia was kind of an unintentional stop on our journey as we were only there for a few hours whilst waiting for our connecting flight. However, this didn’t stop us from getting out and about and exploring the wonderful city of Kuala Lumpur.

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Fun Fact: The Petronas towers are the tallest twin skyscrapers in the world and it was cool to see them right up close! Even if the observation deck was closed on the day that we visited!

And that’s it for the quick whistle stop tour of my travels!

It was a great experience and I would encourage everyone to take the time to do a trip like this if you can!

Thank you to all of the brilliant people that I travelled with and everyone who I met along the way 🙂

 

5 Things Only Final Year Students Will Understand

So graduation is 4 months away…This is not a drill people! As a final year student your life and view of the world changes dramatically and you practically become a different person as you come to the realisation that, yep, you are actually about to enter the world of work as a fully-fledged adult. No more hiding in the SU for you!

Three years is a surprisingly short space of time

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When studying at university, time takes on a new meaning. The weeks go quickly, the months pass quickly and the terms pass even quicker. Suddenly you become confused that you’re in 3rd year but can still remember the first day of first year so vividly.

People start to take an overly keen interest in your life

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So you’ve gone this far without people asking about your life or future career goals. Now that people find out that you’re in your final year suddenly you must have a clear idea of your future… Let me think… No, still haven’t got a clue!

The internal struggle between a good social life and wanting to study hard 

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I want to actually get a good grade, but I don’t want to neglect socialising, but I don’t want to fail, but I want to keep my friends, but I want to do well… it is a vicious circle

People instantly expect you to be an expert

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I may have studied this subject for 3 years but that does not mean that I know everything and anything about it. I’m just as surprised as you when I know the answer.

People keep reminding you of the impending end.

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Now at first I was excited at finishing. Then I remembered that I will no longer be a student. That I will not see my friends that often. That my student discount card will run out. That I will have to start work… and there is always that one person who keeps counting down the days- who are you, the speaking clock?!

How about a mini-trip to Wivenhoe?

A few weeks ago I realised that it’s been a while since I last went to see Wivenhoe. It may be that deadlines kept getting the best of me, but that is no excuse. So, a few days ago I decided to go on a mini-trip and see once again what the town has to offer. Wivenhoe is gorgeous and that is why I decided to share some of my love for it with you. Here are some of my favourite things about the town!

A 15-minute bus ride will take you straight to the heart of Wivenhoe, but if you really want to get the feel of the town, I highly recommend walking. There is a route you can take that just follows the river all the way to town which is absolutely beautiful! Once you get there, go for a stroll along the pier and enjoy the scenery. What I always do is stop by at one of the local cafes to grab something hot and then enjoy it near the docks. And, since the town itself is quite small, it’s always peaceful and quiet no matter when you visit it, which makes me love it even more.

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After you are done looking around the docks, I recommend heading towards the heart of the town. The streets themselves are small and quaint, leading into each other which may feel a bit a bit confusing, but don’t worry, after the first 30-minutes, you will definitely get used to it! Near the train station, an art gallery has opened less than 2 years ago. The building caused much stir for being strictly modern and their exhibitions reflected the same attitude. Their exhibitions consist of a wide range of paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings and pottery of East Anglian and nationally famed artists. So, if you have an interest in art, this is the right place for you!

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And if all that travelling made you hungry, I highly recommend trying out Valentino’s restaurant. This one is a family business and its main focus is Italian food. It has a very traditional look to it and the staff are very friendly. Bonus points: they also make the best lasagna I have ever tried in my life!

 

Obviously, this is just a small part of the town, but hopefully, as you explore, you will also find places that will make you fall in love with Wivenhoe! 🙂

My perception of Feminism

Between 7th to 10th March it was Women’s Week on campus. It was a great opportunity to celebrate women and to think about how far we have come in getting equal rights for women. It is also a good opportunity to think about what else needs to be achieved for women’s rights. So what is my perception on feminism? Like any person, I have my opinions about what I believe feminism is about and what it really means, as opposed to the more ‘taboo’ stereotype it can sometimes have.

We should celebrate how far we have come

First of all, I think that the feminist movement is great. We have come so far, from being given the right to vote, to equal pay acts and gaining more rights for working mothers. Today we have a female Prime Minster and whether she has is feminist or not, she is a great example to young girls that women can be in the top job of the country and there are no limits to what they can become. Years ago, it was expected that women should stay at home and be a housewife, but now more and more women go to work, have a career and be mothers too. More importantly, they have the choice to decide which they’d be happier doing. This is so important to me since I’m soon to enter the world of work, but one day want to be a working mum. This progression and opportunity for choice, that women once didn’t have, is absolutely worth celebrating.

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No sex is superior; we should be equal

I believe that feminism should be about getting equal rights for women and men. In my A-levels I learnt there are some feminist movements that have some really extreme views and very negative opinions about men. I do not believe this type of feminism should be celebrated, because no one sex should be seen as superior. Feminism for me is all about fighting for equality and is just as much about things being equal for men too.

We need to stop gender stereotypes

It is hard not to gender stereotype, because we have all been raised to believe a male must be ‘masculine’ and a female must be ‘girly’. It all starts off when we are babies. Males are put in blue, given footballs and cars; while females are put in pink and given dolls and soft toys, so we can’t really blame ourselves for doing it. But so what if your son wants to wear a pink tutu? And your daughter wants to play football? We should let them express themselves however they want! Equally, there is no shame if a girl wants to play with dolls and a boy wants to play with toy cars, the point is, it should be a choice, not an expectation.

Gender stereotypes can also lead to issues in the workplace. A recent study has found that gender stereotypes in the workplace are still similar to 1980. If a woman wants to be a mechanic then why not shouldn’t she be? If a man wants to be a midwife, why can’t he be? Why are jobs labelled as ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’? Because we are both consciously and subliminally taught to believe it should be like this. We’re all guilty of expecting certain things of men and certain things of women and to a point that’s perfectly fine, because as a general rule the two have their differences, but that shouldn’t mean that doors are closed to anyone in their career purely because of their gender.

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Why it is so important to vote

There was once a time that women couldn’t vote. It’s hard to imagine that there was actually a time when women had to risk their lives just in protest to be allowed to vote. I think we can sometimes take this for granted. Whether you’re interested in politics or not, voting is so important. We didn’t always have this privilege. It shocks me that only 39% of females between 18-24 voted in the last general election. This is our future! We should be voting!

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There are some great female icons

My favourite  icon has to be Michelle Obama. During her 8 years as the first lady, she was in a very powerful position and she could choose what to do with it. One of the main things she chose was to speak up about women’s rights and the right for every girl to have an education!

Another great feminist icon for me is Malala Yousafzai. As a teenager, she was very outspoken about the rights for girls to be educated and nearly died because of her protests. She is the youngest winner of the nobel peace prize, and she deserves every bit of it!

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Of course, there are many other perceptions of feminism and issues that are still very prominent in the world today. Unfortunately, I can’t talk about all the issues facing women in the world today but I know there are a lot more, especially for women in 3rd world countries. But I hope you enjoyed my perception of feminism!

Essex summed up in 3 photos

There are so many note-worthy places on our lovely Colchester campus that are particularly good for Instagram (I’m looking at you, No.64 bus with lakeside view), but to really sum up the Essex experience, I’ve picked these three:

The Towers

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I think that the first thing I have to mention is our Towers. Looking at the campus map, the high grey buildings are surely among the first things that you notice.

Did you know that the Towers were the highest brick buildings in the UK during the time they were constructed? How cool is that?! There are 6 towers in total, 4 North Towers and 2 South Towers. Housing 16 students per floor in South Towers and 13 students per floor in North Towers, they are definitely the most social and fun places to live at on campus! They are the most special as well, since you get 13-16 instant friends when you move in, and since 40% of our campus is international, you are bound to end up in a flat with people from all over the world!

It is true that our Towers might look a little rough around the edges, but they are so prominent at our university that it is impossible not to mention them.

Campus cat

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If there is anything ever more ICONIC to our beloved University than our Campus Cat, name it, I’ll wait. He has been roaming our campus for about 3 years now, and in 2014 we discovered that he has an owner in Greenstead and that his name is Pebbles! Fortunately, Pebbles is still blessing us with his presence and we are more than happy with that. Pebbles, being the icon that he is, is able to go anywhere in the university and none can stop him. In other words – he is our king and we serve him, because he is too cute not to be served. You are able to see him strut peacefully throughout the squares, getting all the attention like the true star that he is. I dare say Pebbles is the most loved member of staff and student body alike and I am sure many would agree with me, too. If you are lucky and fast enough, you can catch him on one of the sofas in the Tony Rich Teaching Centre and pet him or give him the occasional belly rub – he really likes those.

Ivor Crewe Lecture Hall

ivor

 

Ah yes, our beautiful mirror-like Ivor Crewe Lecture Theatre. Or as Prince Charles once called it, our “dustbin” building. I know what you are thinking now – how cool is it that our Lecture Building was royally nicknamed! During your time at our lovely university, you are probably going to see a lot of this building. And not just because of its “LOOK AT ME I’M HERE” kind of appearance, but also of all the 9 am and 5 pm lectures you are going to have there. It surely is a special and nostalgic place for an Essex student. Your first time at the Ivor Crewe will be during Fresher’s week, at the Fresher’s Welcome Speech with all the first years in the same room, knowing hardly anyone, and your last time there will be during your Graduation, among all your university friends that will be more like a family by then, than just friends. That’s why the Ivor Crewe is so special, it’s your starting point, but also your finish line.